What Aaron’s words of advice can teach us about the value of failure

Posted 11.01.18

Aaron grew up in Baltimore where he attended Baltimore School for the Arts and developed a love for the oboe. He was exposed to accomplished musicians who played some of the great classical pieces and it fed his goal of becoming a professional musician. Through constant practice, Aaron worked hard to perfect his art and performed in concerts playing pieces like Richard Strauss’s Oboe Concerto.

Aaron soon found his commitment to becoming a professional musician being tested. He had been waiting for his audition day at his dream college, the Eastman School of Music. When the audition finally came, it went poorly and he immediately knew he would not be accepted. It was a devastating blow. This was supposed to be a joyous moment, but instead he began to question his abilities and all that he had been working towards. Aaron learned what it meant to be resilient. He reached a point where he accepted Eastman School of Music would not be a part of his journey, but he resolved to improve for his future auditions.

Aaron’s persistence paid off. He kept practicing and did much better at his remaining four auditions which lead him to believe in his dreams once again. Today, Aaron is attending the Manhattan School of Music and his words inspire us to continue our mission:

“I learned first-hand that it is not failure that defines you, but how you respond to failure. That can be applied to all aspects of life. You can rise from defeat to succeed another day.”–Aaron

Aaron’s resilient attitude helped him become a Central Scholarship scholar where we were able to connect him with the Richard Louis Caplan Memorial Scholarship Music Performance. We are watching Aaron succeed and set big goals, like pursuing his masters in performance and becoming a part of a professional symphony. We are grateful he has shared his passion with us and it gives us great pride to celebrate his talent!

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